4 feet 2 mouths

walking and eating our way around the world

Archive for the tag “Islands”

Enchanting Halong Bay (by Carmen)

Lone fishing boat in Halong Bay

Lone fishing boat in Halong Bay

The extreme heat of Saigon had started to cool off a bit by the time we reached Dalat and Hoi An.  Now that we were in northern Vietnam it was actually cold.  A thick fog covered the horizon upon our arrival at Halong Bay.  This was not a good thing. We were here for the famous views of limestone islands jutting out of the bright blue water.  If we wanted fog Julia, Jonathan, Nathan and I could have stayed in SF where it is plentiful.  But we had no choice but to go with the flow as our tour guide ushered us to the port.

Our Halong Bay boat for sleeping, eating and sightseeing

Our Halong Bay boat for sleeping, eating and sightseeing

Choosing a tour operator was tricky since each one seems to have just as many bad reviews as they do good ones.  We finally opted for Ethnic Travels and hoped for the best.  I breathed a sigh of relief when our little white boat pulled up to the port. It had a spacious deck above and a cosy dining space below.  Our rooms were clean and comfortable and even had private bathrooms!  It was better than plenty of hotels we’ve stayed in.

Layers of islands

Layers of islands

Small limestone island

Small limestone island

As we embarked on our journey the islands were still shrouded in a thick mist.  But towards the end of the day the sun began to break out, illuminating the beautiful islands that surrounded us.

The textures and colors of our row boat

The textures and colors of our row boat

A floating village home

A floating village home

After cruising a couple hours we made a stop for a floating village.  I expected this to be a sort of tourist trap in which you float around a bit then spend most of the visit at a shop.  But I was surprised instead by an actual, functioning floating village.  It was kind of like a squatter settlement where people do not have to pay any rents.  They just build their little abode and anchor down.  Simple bridges connected the structures, which are more like floating houses than boats.  I liked that the convenience store was a boat filled to the brim, carrying toiletries and snacks, was making its rounds as we rowed by.

Sunset Halong Bay

Sunset Halong Bay

Nathan leaps into still waters

Nathan leaps into still waters

By sunset, we pulled into a protected cove.  I had expected many other boats to surround us since Halong Bay has a reputation for being crowded.  But we were the only ones.  I saw a few boat clusters in the distance but I think our captain was taking us off the beaten track a bit, which I appreciated.  Fewer boats also meant it was easier for Nathan, Jonathan and some of the other hearty souls on the boat to jump off the deck into the water 15 feet below.

Fried fish dinner

Fried fish dinner

Julia, Jonathan and Carmen post-feast

Julia, Jonathan and Carmen post-feast

The food was surprisingly good.  There was generally a fried fish, meat dish, and a couple veggie stir fries at every meal. Dessert consisted of cut bananas, pomelo, pineapple and/or watermelon.

Carmen impersonating a professional kayaker

Carmen impersonating a professional kayaker

In the morning we had the opportunity to kayak around the cove and explore two caves.  Both caves were large and actually went all the way through the island.  In one, they had built a type of banquet hall with chairs and tables ready to be set out.  It would be so awesome to have a party there!

The port at Bai Tu Long Bay

The port at Bai Tu Long Bay

Walking the plank

Walking the plank

Before we knew it our time in Halong was up and we were headed to our next destination, Bai Tu Long Bay.  This is a much less visited area and the simple harbor was much smaller than that of Halong.  This time we boarded a smaller boat because we were on our way to a small island to stay the night.  This boat crew was not exactly as experienced as the first one.  For one, they all looked to be under 25.  And as we pulled up to the island they managed to get stuck on a mud bank. After waiting for the water level to rise a bit we did make it to the harbor, but promptly crashed into a sitting boat.  From there, we walked a series of narrow planks hopping between boats to make it to the dock.  Did I mention that it was dark and we all had our backpacks on? I would not say it was particularly safe but all of us did make it.  We piled into tuk tuks for the bumpy ride to our lodgings. That night the group toasted our successful and safe arrival with beers and rice liquor.

Village market

Village market

By morning only Nathan rose early enough to catch the morning market.  He reported that people sold very small quantities compared to the markets we’ve been to in towns and cities.  For example, a woman might only be selling a bowl full of clams or bag full of shucked oysters or bunches of lettuce greens.  He indulged in s couple corn filled dough nuts and brought me back a peanut bun. What a sweetie.

Horseshoe Crab

Horseshoe Crab

Bai Tu Long beach

Bai Tu Long beach

Shells and sand in close up

Shells and sand in close up

Instead of taking a tuk tuk back to the harbor we took a leisurely bike ride.  We stopped for a walk on a deserted feeling beach.  Now I was really wishing for the heat of Saigon.  As we walked along the shore we found a funky looking horseshoe crab and a series of beautiful shells.

Biking our way to the boat

Biking our way to the boat

All hands on deck

All hands on deck

For only lasting three days we fit a lot into our tour.  Thankfully, the sun came out for us at just the right times.  The limestone islands were as enchanting as I’d hoped.  And as always, it was great to share the experience with friends.

Limestone cliff close up

Limestone cliff close up

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Koh Tao-ism (by Carmen)

Beach view on Koh Tao

Beach view on Koh Tao

We disembarked from our overnight ferry and stepped onto the shores of Koh Tao (Turtle Island) off the east coast of Thailand. Despite the lush hills and palm tree lined shores I was seeing, I was slightly disappointed. There was more rocky cove and less sandy beach than I had been hoping for. We decided to walk north to see what we found. Three kilometers later we winded our way down the path to Bow Thong Resort and found what I was looking for: a little slice of paradise.

Our bungalow

Our bungalow

After quickly settling into our little bungalow, we threw on our swim suits and hopped into a lounge chair. Given the beach bumming in Phuket in the days previous, our trip was feeling more like a vacation than a travel adventure. It’s good to take a break sometimes.

The beach at Bow Thong Resort

The beach at Bow Thong Resort

We spent the day alternating between dipping into the cool, clear waters and hiding from the scorching sun under our umbrella. Since there was wifi on the beach we took the opportunity to call our families and gloat, I mean, let them know we were safe.

Sunset joy

Sunset joy

Fiery sunset

Fiery sunset

The sunset was brilliant and beautiful. The colors merged between sky and sea in a fiery glow. As the day closed it also marked a transition for me. The next morning I woke up and was officially one year older.

Pork noodles

Pork noodles

Duck noodles

Duck noodles

I’m not going to lie. Spending you birthday in paradise is a wonderful thing. I started the day out right with brunch at the oddly named 995 Duck. The pork and duck noodles were the best meal we had on the island.

Koh Nang Yuan

Koh Nang Yuan

Next we boarded a bright orange, blue and green taxi boat for the 10 minute ride to a little strip of sand called Koh Nang Yuan. The coral-strewn sand bar separates two crystal bays punctuated by small, lush hills.

Overprotective snorkeling

Overprotective snorkeling

From our staked out square of sand we watched diving classes, which is the reason most people come to Koh Tao. But today we were part of the snorkeling crowd. This group was entertaining to watch, especially the Chinese mom almost drowning her son with so much floating gear he could hardly move.

Snorkeling bay called the Japanese Garden

Snorkeling bay called the Japanese Garden

When we made it into the water with our masks I was awestruck. The fish were yellow backed with little neon strips of warpaint under their eyes. Black with orange stripes. Bright blue. Neon yellow, green and pink. But the real show stopper was the plant and reef life. The variety of coral from leaf like shapes to stalagmite growths to flat geometric patterns covering rocks. We even saw brilliant purple anemones as big as basketballs. I really wish I had Nalat’s underwater camera to capture it all!

Enjoying the strip of beach

Enjoying the strip of beach

Blooming coconut on a bed of coral

Blooming coconut on a bed of coral

After a short hike, we boarded the taxi back to Koh Tao. I will not soon forget this picture perfect birthday.

Eating carrot cake

Eating carrot cake

But what is a birthday without cake? Fortunately a British expat opened a shop to ensure that anyone requiring baked sweets was not left behind. I enjoyed a very satisfying carrot cake, making me a very happy birthday girl.

Just another beautiful sunset

Just another beautiful sunset

How does it get any better? Another glorious sunset, mango cocktails on a candlelit beach…let’s just say Koh Tao was everything I’d hoped for and more. It was the perfect place to celebrate my birthday as well as the big 3-0 (that’s the number of countries we have visited in our lives – not the number of years quite yet!) Already, country number 31 is in our sights as the temples of Angkor beckon.

Phuket, Get Me Some Dirty Noodles, Extra Spicy (by Nathan)

Dry noodles with pork and dumplings

Dry noodles with pork and dumplings

Enter paradise and you will find that thousands arrived before you and will continuously arrive throughout your stay.  Sometimes we just have to throw up our hands and say “Phuket” and have a good time anyway.  The hoards of tourists make it challenging to get amazing authentic Thai food, thus it became our motto to search for the “dirty noodles.” On side streets and alleyways, market stalls and hilltops we were going to enjoy Phuket and eat well too.  Who cares if your restaurant has a peppy australian or ladyboy serving bolognaise, burgers and beer, we want noodles and curries over rice and make that shit spicy.  4feet2mouths had doubled in proportion with our friends Nalat and Tim.  With scooters and sandals we were determined to explore and conquer Phuket.

Scooty Booty Biker Gang

Scooty Booty Biker Gang

Pork fried rice

Pork fried rice

Phuket is an island, a rather large island with multiple cities.  We desperately needed wheels and it was hard to resist almost new scooters at $7 per day.  It seemed rather funny that so many blondes and beach bebops rode around in just skimpy bathing suits.  Instead we wore clothes, Tim and I fashioned bandannas on our heads, our ladies grabbed on tight and the birth of a new biker gang emerged from the depths of Kata Beach: Scooty Booty.  The first stop was dirty noodles of course!  We had egg noodles, rice noodles and crispy noodles with clear, spicy and red broths and pork balls, fish balls, shrimp and wontons.  The second lunch of the day was a fried rice stand.  Up and down the island we rode and not even a late monsoon rain storm could stop us.

Fluorescent sunset

Fluorescent sunset

Feast at Khao Rung Tung Ka Cafe

Feast at Khao Rung Tung Ka Cafe

The evening approached with a sunset that made the eighties look dull.  The pinks were so bright that I started to miss “A Flock Of Seagulls.”  Back on our scooters hogs we putted roared into the night.  We snaked through the jungle and up a small mountain to treat ourselves to a fabulous Thai meal looking over the city.  Go to Khao Rung Tung Ka Cafe if you are in Phuket. We ordered spicy shrimp “dip” with fresh veggies, local greens pak good, satol beans with pork, coconut crab curry with rice noodles and a whole fish roasted with lemongrass. It was another Thai feast and oh was it good.

Phuket school of fish

Phuket school of fish (Photo credit: Nalat)

Tim and I snorkeling

Tim and I snorkeling (Photo credit: Nalat)

Floating leaf

Floating leaf

We needed the fuel because the next day we scuba dove into the crystal clear depths of the Indian Ocean.  Schools of fish fluttered around us of every color.  Lion fish, eels, and cuttlefish entertained us with each artificial breath.  We were able to do some snorkeling with a waterproof camera.

Three paper lanterns ready to take flight

Three paper lanterns ready to take flight

That night was special across Thailand.  The first full moon of the dry season, called Loi Krathong, enables a time of hope for the months ahead.  Woven boats carry candles and wishes into the tide and paper lanterns float away with promises and dreams.  We each released a lantern into the sky.  The light frame and tissue encasing are carefully expanded with the ocean breeze then the coil is lit on fire.  The hot air fills the cubic balloon and with a hopeful holding of our breath we each in turn made a wish and let go…  They climb higher and higher into the night transforming to a tiny orange speck among the stars.  The flame either silently fades out of existence or lights the entire lantern ablaze as a last glorified hoorah.

Phi Phi Island

Phi Phi Island

Colorful boat taxi on Phi Phi island

Colorful boat taxi on Phi Phi island

Our next day ws another stuffed with beautiful sights.  We positioned ourselves on a sardine can of a boat set out for Phi Phi island.  The scenery was magical with black cliffs climbing sharply from the sea and topped with tropical jungles.  White sugar-like beaches, coral formations and a variety of fish all welcomed us to this paradise.  We snorkeled, avoided the crowds and snorkeled some more.  The sun was intense and the water slightly cooler and refreshing.

Hermit crab (photo credit: Nalat)

Hermit crab (photo credit: Nalat)

At night we wondered along Kata Beach in search of food.  We opted for the ocean view atmosphere over the “locals eat here.”  Nalat must have told them to rock our world because this meal was the spiciest thing we have consumed in Thailand.  At one point Carmen had tears dripping down her cheeks between bites.  And all of us dripped with sweat to deal with the Thai heat.  That night Nalat found this wonderful helmet crab on the prowl along the shore.

Grilled chicken with spicy, tangy sweet dipping sauce

Grilled chicken with spicy, tangy sweet dipping sauce

Pad Krapow!

Pad Krapow!

A morning at the beach and we were ready for more food.  We trekked our way up to the busy main road in search of other Thais eating lunch.  We found a guy grilling some chicken and the attached cafe tucked away.  I had been craving pad ka prow, ground pork, chillies and a more medicinal tasting Thai holy basil.  Again we ate more than our fair share, but real Thai food is so good!

Phuket waterfall

Phuket waterfall

Lantern street in Phuket Town

Lantern street in Phuket Town

With an afternoon free we rented some more scooters and unleashed terror on the streets.  We visited and hiked to a small waterfall.  We cruised the streets in search of restaurants, markets and whatever had people and food.  Again we found ourselves sharing bowls of slimy and rich pork noodles.  For dessert we grabbed a bag of rambutans and mangosteens to be eaten at the hotel.

Phuket sunset silhouette

Phuket sunset silhouette

Want to know the sign of good friends?  Friends will join us anywhere in the world just to tell us that we are missed.  Great friends realize that we might be missing good wine by now.  Nalat and Tim brought us not one, but two bottles (a Bordeaux and Turley at that!).  The laughs and conversation continued late into the night.  In the morning they left us, the room felt empty and the reality of it being only 4feet2mouths was once again.

Boat noodles in a bookstore

Boat noodles in a bookstore

Delectable boat noodles

Delectable boat noodles

Carmen and I packed our bags and made way for Phuket Town.  We wondered aimlessly without our Thai guide Nalat.  There was still hope for us as we did discover this wonderful Blog.  There was only one thing that could sooth us from missing our friends…dirty noodles.  Coffee shop in a bookstore: BORING, boat noodles in a bookstore? That’s AWESOME!  A touch of sugar, a little vinegar and chillies, a dabble of fish sauce and a spoonful of dried red peppers and we were on our way to feeling much better. Noodles doctored to perfection!

Kanom jee spread

Kanom jee spread

In the morning we were in higher spirits.  The rain crashed in buckets overhead, but with our ponchos we stayed mostly dry.  Breakfast had one goal- Kanom jee at Pa Mai.  We doused a plateful of rice noodles with several curries and sat down at a table.  A tray  of crisp and pickled vegetables awaited our consumption.  There was a renewed sense of strength within us, “we can do this, we can travel within Thailand.”

Bags packed full and buckles cinched tight we were on the move.  Local bus to the bus terminal, then a five hour regional bus to the ferry terminal.  A meal from several streetside carts  delivered us more boat noodles, fried rice and spicy long beans.  Sandals off, we crawled onto our mat beds for the night.  The rumble and rocking of the boat was almost enough for a peaceful night’s rest. Goodnight Phuket, goodnight to our friends and family (and readers).  In the morning we will be in Koh Tao.

Dancing and Hiking in Copacabana and Isla Del Sol Bolivia (by Nathan)

Copacabana Bolivia

A trip through Bolivia would never be complete without seeing Copacabana and Lake Titicaca.  Carmen insisted that we stop here and we discovered a small cultural center tucked into a beautiful lake bay.

Two plates of trout

Sunset on Copacabana harbor

The most delicious thing about a town positioned on a lake is that there is access to fresh fish.  For weeks we had been chanting “trucha!” as a way to bring up spirits and remember the funny feijoada experience in Rio.  Now, in Copacabana, there were restaurants everywhere serving trout twenty different ways. And they are all really good.  We found a lakeside kiosk and ordered up one fish “de la diabla” (spicy red sauce) and another “a la plancha con aji” (grilled with garlic).  The fish was tender and juicy and by far the best trout I have ever had!

Our bus on a barge

But I’m getting a little ahead of myself.  We arrived to Copacabana from La Paz on a bus.  The bus saves some time from driving around the large peninsula and we all had to ride a short ferry ride across the bay.  Even the bus was loaded onto a barge and carried across.  Then the bus weaved its way in and out of the fingers of the lake and eventually dropped into the cute little town.  We expected a calm, tranquil town, but instead found thousands of people and a raging party.

Parade dancing

Lantern costumes

Lantern costumes

Our arrival in Copacabana coincided with one of the biggest holidays in Bolivia, La Fiesta de la Cruz.  It begins around May 3 and lasts for four non-stop days.  Everybody participates and everyone was part of a color coordinated group.  The women wore brightly ornate dresses with bulbous flowing skirts and of course a bowler hat.  The men performed in marching bands or wore lantern-like costumes.  Each group of 100 to 200 people would parade up and down the streets and eventually arrive at the Iglesia de la Sagrada Cruz.

Couple on there way to dance in the plaza

Dancing on the plaza

The party did not stop there.  These groups would converge onto two main plazas.  The marching bands would stand on concrete bleachers swaying to the music, blowing their horns and slamming their drums.  Everyone was dancing in a sway and twirl back and forth.  The dance actually mimics a fighting style as this festival used to be a way for men of different tribes to compete for land.  Supposedly these fights still happen, but we did not see any.

Crazy firework apparatus

Throughout the day the song of the bands was only broken by the sharp crack and pop of fireworks.  At night the pyros had a feast of lights, sparks, flames and kabooms to entertain the crowd.  Carmen and I sat watching as what seemed one in ten rockets failing to explode in the sky came crashing into the plazas below.  At one point they brought out this crazy PVC pipe apparatus thirty feet tall.  Upon lighting it the pyro’s shoulder catches fire from the twirling sparks.  He pats it out and runs for cover as the sparks and flames fly out in all directions.  The colors and light illuminate the people that continue to dance next to this thing.  I looked over at Carmen and there is a mixed expression of fear and intrigued excitement .  The structure ends with sparks spewing out of a cross with high-pitched whistles then the whole thing catches fire.

View from our hotel room

Lofted bed and hammocks

Outside of the partying, Carmen and I found the nicest hotel we have ever stayed.  It was called Las Olas.  Our dining table overlooked the beautiful Copacabana bay.  Our room included indoor and outdoor hammocks, comfortable beds and a kitchenette all for $42 a night which was a splurge for Bolivia.

Sunset on Copacabana

The festivities were a ten minute walk from our scenic overlook.  At sunset our hammocks seemingly rocked to the rhythms of the trumpets.  Throughout the night the horns entered our dreams and at sunrise hundreds of people were still drinking and dancing.

Arch of abandoned building

Copacabana cathedral

The city itself is very picturesque.  The nearby hills provide wonderful overlooks and the bright cathedral is magnificent.  Carmen and I wandered the streets maneuvering around the parade and tasting everything the street vendors had to offer.

Bowl of trout ceviche

One dish I could not walk away from was a woman serving heaping bowls of ceviche from her plaza tent. People crowded around so the turnover looked good.  The end result was sour, spicy and crunchy with crisp roasted corn kernels.

Isla del Sol

Copacabana was just one reason for this destination.  The other was to experience and see more of Lake Titicaca.  This lake is enormous.  The size of the lake is roughly four times that of San Francisco Bay and 0ne hundred times deeper.  The lake is one of the highest in the world at 13,000 feet.

Terraced hillsides of Isla del Sol

We hopped on a ferry and travelled for two hours to Isla del Sol (the Island of the Sun).  The island was sacred to the Inca who believed it was the birthplace of humans.  Our plan was to spend the night and hike the ruins and across the whole island.

Sunrise from Isla del Sol

That evening we met some new friends Chris and Megan from Brisbane.  Sitting in the sand and watching the sun set we swapped travel stories of their camping in Africa and ours of eating through Asia.  We shared some bottles of Bolivian red wine and ate several aromatic plates of trucha.  It was an unexpectedly fun night in a village of less than fifty people.

Pigs napping on the path

The alarm went off when it was still dark.  We wanted to see sunrise on Isla del Sol.  In the faint light of dawn, pigs blocked our path, and then we met a puppy that wanted to hike with us.  These were our first Inca ruins and we were excited.  The ruins included a village of stone buildings and a sacrificial table that were five hundred years old.  And we were disappointed! Bolivia does not protect or care about its cultural treasures.  Our sunrise hike discovered a group of vagrant backpackers that had cooked dinner on the sacrificial table leaving their trash to scatter the site while they slept on the ruins.  A wrong turn in the stone structures and we found where they used the restroom.  How disrespectful can these people be?

Inca ruins on Isla del Sol

Inca ridge path

The buildings themselves were small and not the high quality masonry we would see in Peru.  The best part about Isla del Sol was not the ruins, but the walk itself.  The sacred Inca trail followed the ridgeline of the island and allowed for endless views of Lake Titicaca.  The water was deep blue that met the terraced hillsides that were cultivated five hundred years ago.  We climbed and dipped along the islands spine arriving to the south side for the island.  Another ferry and we bobbed our way to Copacabana.  We immediately grabbed a bus and we were on our way to Peru.  Copacabana and Isla del Sol already a memory of culture, a lake and trout.

Carmen on Inca path

The Tiny Island of Ihla Do Mel (by Nathan)

Colorful fishing boat

Colorful fishing boat

Time for a vacation from this vacation.  Traveling is hard work. Every few days we pack our rucksacks and transport ourselves to a new destination.  Each place is an adventure and every city requires planning for places to eat, sights to see and activities to entertain.  To us, this is the fun of traveling, an adventure wherever we go.

We try to spend an afternoon here and there reading or napping, but then we get to the point where we need a few days to really relax. We grabbed our swim suits and headed to the tiny Ilha do Mel (Honey Island).

Docks of Parana

Docks of Paraguaná

Originally it was a colonial fort, but now it has less than 1000 residents, no cars, no roads, just sandy paths, lush forests and pristine beaches.  I’m relaxing just writing about it!

Buffet in Paraná

Buffet in Paraguaná

The only way to get to the island is by ferry from Paraguaná or Ponta do Sol.  Before departing we grabbed lunch at a per kilo restaurant. The variety and quality of food at these places is wonderful.  We filled our plates with feijão (black beans) and salads and then waddled our way onto the boat.   Then we chugged along through the calm blue waters to the island.

Water sunset

Water sunset

There are two villages on the island.  We stayed on the southern edge in Encantadas.  Our hostel was adorable with its own wooden balcony and two hammocks overlooking the beach.  A five minute walk and we were in the water watching the sun disappear behind the mountains.

Dinner in the sand

Dinner in the sand

We had several options for dinner that night.  We walked along the beach with our sandals in our hands until we found a place that offered everything we wanted.  The owner suckered us in first complimenting our Portuguese then questioning us if we were Argentinean.  We gorged on fish shrimp, fries, salad, rice and feijão.  With our feet in the sand we quenched our thirst with a caipirinha or two.

Playa Grande

Playa Grande

Travel around the island is by foot along winding sandy trails through the forest that emerge on picturesque beaches.  We traveled here mid-week and the island was empty.  Supposedly the island is packed with thousands of people in January, but we were only aware of fifteen or so tourists during our stay.

Grilled fish with capers at Mar e Sol

Grilled fish with capers at Mar e Sol

We would swim at a beach, bathing in the sun for a few hours, then grab our day pack and hike to another part of the island.  The other village is called Nova Brasilia and there is about an hour and a half walk between there and Encantadas.  There is also a ferry that is about twenty minutes that runs every 1-2 hours.  For lunch we plopped our sandy bodies down on the bench seats of Mar e Sol.  They grilled us a delicious fish, heaped high with capers the size of small grapes, bursting with salty brine in every bite.

Ihla do Mel fort

Ihla do Mel fort

A few hours more in the sun, and miles of beaches later, we arrived at the northern tip.  Here we found the remains of the historic fort with thick ornate white-washed walls and canons to protect the island from the Spanish.

Carmen on a sandbar in the sunset

Carmen on a sandbar in the sunset

Our little beach in Encantadas has this special sand bar.  The tide would recede in the evenings abandoning the fishing boats in the sand.  It was a challenge to become fully submerged.  We walked 300-400 feet from the shore and the water was still knee deep!

In the morning the water would return and wipe away the foot traffic of the previous day.  The revived boats bobbed happily in the water.

Banana fritters

Banana fritters

Our hostel served us a particularly wonderful breakfast of fresh papaya, mango, watermelon, bananas, bread and jam.  On the last morning  the quiet young woman that ran the hostel made us these delicious banana fritters (if you know the name please comment).  Crispy and sweet on the outside and gooey oozing banana on the inside.  Perfect dumplings of joy from the perfect and beautiful little Isla do Mel.

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